French Recipes

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Some of our favorite French fare from Jacques Pépin, Julia Child, Pierre Franey and the recipe archive of The New York Times.

NYT Food
Easy Vegetable SoupWinter VegetablesVegetarian SoupVegetable StockGood Food

Soupe au Pistou (Vegetable Soup With Pesto) Recipe

The omelet is the egg taken to its very highest form. With nothing more than salt and the tiniest amount of butter added, the omelet celebrates the richness of eggs without distracting from their delicacy.  (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)
Cooking RecipesCooking GamesBreakfast Recipes

The New Essentials of French Cooking

The omelet is the egg taken to its very highest form. With nothing more than salt and the tiniest amount of butter added, the omelet celebrates the richness of eggs without distracting from their delicacy. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

With only two main ingredients, butter and potatoes, pommes Anna is a minimalist triumph of French technique. It is also one of the more challenging potato dishes to prepare and a true glory to any cook who makes it correctly. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)
Cooking TipsCooking RecipesNytimes RecipesCooking Games

The New Essentials of French Cooking

With only two main ingredients, butter and potatoes, pommes Anna is a minimalist triumph of French technique. It is also one of the more challenging potato dishes to prepare and a true glory to any cook who makes it correctly. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

French pastries are as much a savory tradition as they are a sweet one, enmeshed in the rhythms of daily life. That is particularly true of the country’s various onion tarts, of which quiche is the most celebrated. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

The New Essentials of French Cooking

French pastries are as much a savory tradition as they are a sweet one, enmeshed in the rhythms of daily life. That is particularly true of the country’s various onion tarts, of which quiche is the most celebrated. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

Here is the dish that made Julia Child fall in love with French cuisine: delicate fish fillets, lightly sautéed and covered with browned butter. She declared her first bite "a morsel of perfection." Once you have had sole meunière, you will see why. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)
Fish DishesSeafood DishesSeafood RecipesSole MeuniereSo Little Time

The New Essentials of French Cooking

Here is the dish that made Julia Child fall in love with French cuisine: delicate fish fillets, lightly sautéed and covered with browned butter. She declared her first bite "a morsel of perfection." Once you have had sole meunière, you will see why. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

From a simple omelet to stunning soufflés, The New York Times presents the definitive French dishes that every modern cook should master. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)
Favorite RecipesFood And Drink

The New Essentials of French Cooking

From a simple omelet to stunning soufflés, The New York Times presents the definitive French dishes that every modern cook should master. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

The French have a genius for cooking with vegetables. Even the humblest onion is transformed into something glorious in the hands of a Gallic cook. Ratatouille, one of jewels of Provençal cooking, is a fine example of that tradition. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

The New Essentials of French Cooking

The French have a genius for cooking with vegetables. Even the humblest onion is transformed into something glorious in the hands of a Gallic cook. Ratatouille, one of jewels of Provençal cooking, is a fine example of that tradition. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

A hallmark of French cooking, the soufflé is like magic. It uses nothing more than air to transform workaday eggs into a lofty masterpiece, puffing and browning in the oven before collapsing at first bite. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)
Gourmet DessertsSouffle Recipes

The New Essentials of French Cooking

A hallmark of French cooking, the soufflé is like magic. It uses nothing more than air to transform workaday eggs into a lofty masterpiece, puffing and browning in the oven before collapsing at first bite. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

Where would French cuisine be without wine? It is as important in the pot as it is in the glass, the base of myriad stews and braises. One of the best is coq au vin, in which chicken is slowly simmered with red wine. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

The New Essentials of French Cooking

Where would French cuisine be without wine? It is as important in the pot as it is in the glass, the base of myriad stews and braises. One of the best is coq au vin, in which chicken is slowly simmered with red wine. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for NYT)

The croque monsieur at the Odeon. (Photo: Daniel Krieger for The New York Times)
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The Odeon’s Not-So-Bright Lights Still Beckon (Published 2016)

The croque monsieur at the Odeon. (Photo: Daniel Krieger for The New York Times)

It’s a marvel still, every time I make this dish, to recognize how the humble potato — the misshapen, dull brown dirty lump — can become this opulent, glistening, colossally elegant jewel with nothing more than attentive care, a sharp blade and good butter. (Photo: Gentl and Hyers for The New York Times)

Pommes Anna Recipe

It’s a marvel still, every time I make this dish, to recognize how the humble potato — the misshapen, dull brown dirty lump — can become this opulent, glistening, colossally elegant jewel with nothing more than attentive care, a sharp blade and good butter. (Photo: Gentl and Hyers for The New York Times)

Crème brûlée in a marrow bone. It is lovely and weird, the familiar custard supplemented with a flavor that is unmistakably animal. (Photo: Liz Barclay for The New York Times)
Angie MarRestaurant New YorkCaramel Apples

At the Beatrice Inn, Cuisine for Animals (Published 2016)

Crème brûlée in a marrow bone. It is lovely and weird, the familiar custard supplemented with a flavor that is unmistakably animal. (Photo: Liz Barclay for The New York Times)

This chicken casserole is simple to prepare, yet stunning and a trifle unusual to serve. The addition of whole clusters of seedless grapes elevates it from easy everyday to dinner-party material. (Photo: Rikki Snyder for The New York Times)
Grape RecipesMeat RecipesCooking RecipesChicken RecipesEntrees

Chicken Braised With Grapes Recipe

This chicken casserole is simple to prepare, yet stunning and a trifle unusual to serve. The addition of whole clusters of seedless grapes elevates it from easy everyday to dinner-party material. (Photo: Rikki Snyder for The New York Times)

Potatoes aren't usually associated with Provençal cooking, but every French region must have its gratin: sliced potatoes baked into a delicious mass that is the perfect side dish for roasts. The binder can be milk, broth, cream or, as in this case, the natural juices of vegetables like tomatoes and onions. (Photo: France Keyser for The New York Times)

Julia Child’s Provençal Potato Gratin Recipe

Potatoes aren't usually associated with Provençal cooking, but every French region must have its gratin: sliced potatoes baked into a delicious mass that is the perfect side dish for roasts. The binder can be milk, broth, cream or, as in this case, the natural juices of vegetables like tomatoes and onions. (Photo: France Keyser for The New York Times)

Hearty but not heavy, this stew uses lots of summer vegetables available from the farmers' market. It’s a little complicated to put together, but both the vegetable stew and the couscous can be made in advance, even a day ahead, without suffering. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Summer Vegetable Couscous With Spicy Pesto Recipe

Hearty but not heavy, this stew uses lots of summer vegetables available from the farmers' market. It’s a little complicated to put together, but both the vegetable stew and the couscous can be made in advance, even a day ahead, without suffering. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Hearty but not heavy, this stew uses lots of summer vegetables available from the farmers' market. It’s a little complicated to put together, but both the vegetable stew and the couscous can be made in advance, even a day ahead, without suffering. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Summer Vegetable Couscous With Spicy Pesto Recipe

Hearty but not heavy, this stew uses lots of summer vegetables available from the farmers' market. It’s a little complicated to put together, but both the vegetable stew and the couscous can be made in advance, even a day ahead, without suffering. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)