Korean vegetables

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Some of the delicious and healthy vegetables that grow in Korea.

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The lotus is a lovely plant, and in Korea every single part of it has a purpose. The flowers are used for tea, the leaves for rice, the seeds for herbal medicine and the stems for flavoring (dried stems can be used in pickling jars)....

Yeongeun: Lotus root · bburi kitchen

The lotus is a lovely plant, and in Korea every single part of it has a purpose. The flowers are used for tea, the leaves for rice, the seeds for herbal medicine and the stems for flavoring (dried stems can be used in pickling jars). But it’s the roots that are the best known and

Have you ever cooked with hamcho (함초, samphire, glasswort or sea asparagus)? It's a salty, delicious seaside vegetable! #koreanfood #koreancooking #homecooking #samphire #naturalfood #healthyeating
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Hamcho: Samphire, glasswort, sea asparagus · bburi kitchen

Travel along the southwest coast in summer and you may come across a bright green, succulent-like plant stretching upwards like a tiny tree from the mudflat. This is hamcho (함초, samphire or glasswort, Salicornia herbacea), a beach green once known only to locals and now popular across the South Korean peninsula. It’s known colloquially as

Korean food isn’t always spicy—there are plenty of mild, savory dishes without that well-known spicy kick. But spicy flavors are popular, and we have the gochu (고추, chilli) to thank for that. Harold McGee tells us there are 25 species of chillies in the world, five of which have...

Korean chilies 101 · bburi kitchen

Korean food isn’t always spicy—there are plenty of mild, savory dishes without that well-known spicy kick. But spicy flavors are popular, and we have the gochu (고추, chili) to thank for that. Harold McGee tells us there are 25 species of chilies in the world, five of which have been domesticated. Here in Korea, we have Capsicum annuum, the oldest

Shiraegi is a beloved winter vegetable made from dried radish greens. Nothing goes to waste, and plus it's really nutritious. #koreanfood #koreancooking #vegetables

Shiraegi: Dried radish greens · bburi kitchen

Sometimes, over here at bburi kitchen, we’re guilty of romanticizing the past. “Our ancestors ate so healthily,” we’ll sigh. Or: “They used up every last scrap! Nothing went to waste back then.” While neither of us would actually trade our modern lives for the hardships of years gone by, some older ways of eating are

Doraji is one of the most well-known root vegetables in Korean cuisine—there's even a folk song about it! #koreanfood #koreancooking #healthy #healthyeating #healthycooking
Korean VegetablesRoot VegetablesHealthy EatingKorean StyleJapchaeEthnic Recipes

Doraji: A bittersweet root · bburi kitchen

There’s an old song in Korean about doraji (도라지, bellflower root). After Arirang, the Doraji Taryeong is Korea’s second most-known folk song. The lyrics vary from region to region but all of them are narrated by someone who has gone deep into the mountains to look for the white doraji. “Just one or two

Godeulbbaegi is a bitter vegetable that Koreans eat root and leaves in the spring and fall. #koreanfood #koreancooking #healthy #healthyeating
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Goddeulbbaegi: The bitter old man of the vegetable world · bburi kitchen

Of all the vegetables in the traditional Korean diet, godeulbbaegi (고들빼기, Crepidiastrum sonchifolium) is the most intensely bitter. With its short, knobby tuber and long, green leaves, godeulbbaegi resembles a stunted parsnip, and it’s not a stretch to imagine the root as a grumpy little man, rooty arms crossed beneath a gritty, puckered face. The

Gomchwi (곰취) is a special mountain herb that keeps its flavor even after cooking. | bburi kitchen  #koreancooking #koreanfood #vegetables
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Gomchwi: a pungent mountain herb · bburi kitchen

Jirisan, or Mt. Jiri, has a special place in the minds and hearts of Koreans—it’s often viewed as a wild place, a vast place, a place where nature still has some power. It’s also unique in that the mountain crosses the borders of three different provinces: North and South Jeolla, and South Gyeongsang. We came

Cham-namul (참나물), a fragrant spring green that's easily confused with a Japanese transplant. | bburi kitchen  #koreanfood #koreancooking #vegetables

Cham-namul (Pimpinella brachycarpa): A case of mistaken identity · bburi kitchen

Digging into the story of cham-namul turned out to be a case study in mistaken identities, a plant world mystery of invasion and identity theft. First of all, there’s no good translation of cham-namul in English, and that’s because it’s very very much a local Korean ingredient. Cham-namul, or Pimpinella brachycarpa, has been growing in